Eager to cool down from your hot flashes? The REPLENISH Study may be right for you.

See if you qualify >

Do hot flashes leave you irritable and feeling frustrated?

Do they interrupt your good night's sleep?

If you wish there were a way to get your hot flashes under control, the REPLENISH Study might be right for you. This medical research study is evaluating an investigational medication to see if it may reduce the frequency of hot flashes and sweating associated with menopause.

Find out if the REPLENISH Study may help you feel like yourself again.

GET STARTED TODAY >

To qualify, you must be:

  • Female between the ages of 40 and 65
  • Have not had a hysterectomy
  • Suffer from several hot flashes a day

Study Participants:

  • Receive study medication at no cost
  • Receive study-related medical exams (similar to an annual gynecologist visit) at no charge
  • Are not required to have insurance
  • May be reimbursed for time, travel and other expenses

About the REPLENISH Study

Hot flashes are a natural part of life, but wouldn't it be refreshing if there were a way to control them and keep your cool through it all?

Women have hot flashes because of a decreased level of the hormone estrogen which occurs with menopause. The REPLENISH Study is a clinical research study evaluating an investigational medication for menopausal symptoms, like hot flashes and sweating.

The investigational medication being evaluated is a bio-identical hormone that may increase your hormone levels and prevent hot flashes so you can feel like yourself again. A bio-identical hormone is the same hormone that is already in your body.

See if you may be able to beat the heat of your hot flashes.

GET STARTED TODAY >

To qualify, you must be:

  • Female between the ages of 40 and 65
  • Have not had a hysterectomy
  • Suffer from several hot flashes a day

Study Participants:

  • Receive study medication at no cost
  • Receive study-related medical exams (similar to an annual gynecologist visit) at no charge
  • Are not required to have insurance
  • May be reimbursed for time, travel and other expenses

Frequently Asked Questions

Hot flashes are the most frequent symptoms of menopause. More then two thirds of women going through menopause experience hot flashes.

A hot flash - sometimes called a hot flush - is a momentary sensation of heat that may be accompanied by a red, flushed face and sweating. Hot flashes occur when the blood vessels near the skin's surface dilate to cool. This produces the red, flushed look to the face. A woman may also perspire to cool down the body. In addition, some women experience a rapid heart rate or chills.

Hot flashes accompanied with sweating can also occur at night. These are called night sweats and may interfere with sleep.

Source: http://www.webmd.com/menopause/guide/hot-flashes

A clinical trial, also known as a medical research study, is a carefully designed study that is conducted with human subjects. Subjects are asked to take an investigational medication under the supervision of a physician and other research professionals to determine whether it is safe and effective for a specific disease or condition. An investigational medication is a medication that has not been approved by the FDA or other regulatory health authorities. Clinical trials must follow rules set by the FDA or other regulatory health authorities, and each study must be approved by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) or Ethics Committee (EC). An IRB or EC is a group of people that is responsible for helping to protect the rights and welfare of research study subjects. IRBs or ECs are usually made up of doctors, scientists, religious representatives, and other medical and nonmedical people. Clinical trials can help determine whether or not an investigational medication can be approved by the FDA or other regulatory health authorities, and help develop other investigational medications in the future.

People volunteer to participate in a medical research study for a number of reasons, including the development of investigational medications. Whatever the reason, be sure to make an informed choice about participating in a clinical trial.

You will be asked to review and sign an “Informed Consent Form” prior to study participation. An Informed Consent Form provides a detailed description of the specific trial, any possible known risks and benefits of participating, and what is expected of you as a subject. If you qualify for the trial and sign the Informed Consent Form, you will be enrolled into the trial. Once enrolled in a trial, you will receive study-related examinations and your medical history will be reviewed. You will also be expected to come to the trial site for assessments at scheduled visits. Feel free to discuss your trial-related medical care with the trial physician or any research staff member at any time during the course of the clinical trial. It is important that you take all the trial medication as prescribed and attend all the scheduled visits. It is also important for you to answer questions regarding how you feel during your participation, and whether the investigational medication has been taken at the scheduled times. Your study physician needs to record any symptoms, no matter how minor they may seem. If you miss a dose of the study medication or do not use it on schedule, tell your trial physician or research staff. As a participant, you have the right to leave the study at any time without any penalty to your current medical care.

In this trial, some subjects will receive the active investigational medication, while other subjects will receive placebo (a capsule with no active medication). All subjects will have at least a 4 in 5 chance of receiving active investigational medication. Regardless of whether someone receives the active investigational medication or placebo, the level of trial-related care she receives will be the same. Another risk is that investigational medications being tested may have serious side effects. Because the investigational medication being tested is new, side effects are sometimes unknown. Speak with the study physician or research staff about the possible side effects of medications used in this trial.

After a clinical trial is complete, all of the information is collected and analyzed to help determine the trial medication's safety, effectiveness, and side effects. Please consult with your doctor or regular healthcare provider to determine your treatment options after you have completed the trial.

You may be reimbursed for time, travel and other expenses.

TherapeuticsMD is sponsoring this trial.

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